Archive for the ‘Diagnosed as a Child’ Category

Video: Crystal Bowersox

 

Contributor: Crystal Bowersox; singer-songwriter and runner-up on the ninth season of American Idol.  crystalbowersox.com

Connection: Adult living with type 1 diabetes

Quote: “I’m really enjoying my life, and my health. I just wanted to make this video to let everyone know that you can achieve your dreams.”

Video: Abril and Mary

Contributor: Abril and her mom, Mary

Connection: Child with type 1 diabetes, and caregiver/parent

English Translation (approximate):

Child: “Hi, my name is Abril and I have type 1 diabetes and I was diagnosed when I was 7 years old. I feel really happy and I can do whatever I want.”

Mom: “Hello, my name is Mary and I am Abril’s mom. It has been a year with Ms. Diabetes in the house, but we have realized that we can do anything. There have been some changes, right?”

Child: “Mmhmm.”

Mom: “We have to exercise more, change some of our eating habits. About a year ago I couldn’t even talk about it. I would cry and cry. And today, I see that it is bad but it can be done. We have changed a lot, and we feel really happy about that. What makes me happier is that Abril can do anything – she competes in triathlons, marathons, she runs, she swims, and jumps. She is absolutely happy, and we have learned from this. Most importantly, we have to learn, right? Read and learn a lot about diabetes to succeed.”

Video: Kennedy

Contributor: Kennedy

Connection: Living with type 1 diabetes

Quote: “What diabetes has taught me is that you can’t let it rule your life. You’re not any different than anyone else; you’re just ‘limited edition’. Don’t be afraid.”

Video: Friends For Life “Words of Hope” – Kids With T1D

Just as we did in 2012, we asked people who visited our booth at the Friends For Life conference to share a little bit about their own journey with diabetes, and their advice for others. We had so many people participate this year that we’ve split the messages into three separate videos – here’s the third of three videos, featuring kids living with type 1 diabetes.

What advice would you share with children living with T1D? Leave your own “words of hope” in the comments below!

Video: Emily

Contributor: Emily; http://aimingforaverage-a1c.blogspot.com/

Connection: Adult with type 1 diabetes

Quote: “A lot of people sympathize with me when they hear that I have to inject myself with a huge needle every three days when I change my infusion site. I guess it’s easy for non-diabetics to sympathize with the physical pain, because that’s something they can understand or have experienced themselves, but what they can’t understand is the other kinds of pain that come with this disease: the loneliness of feeling like you’re the only one having to deal with it, the anger and self-pity that comes when you’re wondering, ‘Why me?’, and the frustration and disappointment when your A1C comes back too high.”

Video: Kim

Contributor: Kim; @txtngmypancreas

Connection: Adult with type 1 diabetes; creator of the You Can Do This Project

Quote: “If you’re having a tough time living with diabetes, I totally get that. But I also want you to know that even when it gets super tough, you can bounce back from that. Talk to people – you won’t want to, because you won’t think they’ll ‘get it’, but you need to. I wish I had.”

Blog: Crystal

Contributor: Crystal, http://randomlycapitalized.wordpress.com

Connection: Person with type 1 diabetes

Blog post: http://randomlycapitalized.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/you-can-do-this/

“Mostly what I learned, because it’s in my face way too often, is how Hard it is to receive “assistance” for a single, white female, 30s, educated, employed. Heck, add in the unemployed and it still doesn’t matter. Again, no advice needed, I’ve been there, read it, looked it up, looked into it.

If any Any of you have questions about either unemployment, looking for work or living withOut insurance, never hesitate to ask, comment, tweet or email me. Never. I am an open book. If I can help, I will. That is a promise.

I, a pre-existing chronic of twenty six years, educated and unemployed, uninsured and lacking self confidence, lonely, depressed, scared at times single thirty two year old female, Can Do This because I have. And so can you.”