Archive for the ‘Mental Health’ Category

Video: Amanda

Contributor: Amanda

Connection: Adult with type 1 diabetes; diagnosed at age 14

Quote: “It’s great to see that there’s people here that I can relate to, and know that I’m not alone in this struggle that is diabetes. [Diabetes] doesn’t have to be who you are. “

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“We Can Do This”: Vol. 3

This is the third episode of “We Can Do This” – a series of group videos where people with diabetes come together around a common topic and share their diagnosis stories, lessons learned, and advice for others. Launched in 2012, the first video showcased five people who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as adults, while the second featured three people who live with diabetes-related anxiety.

Something that many people living with diabetes (of any type) face is the persistence of stereotypes and stigmas. You may have faced some of these inaccurate, and sometimes offensive, comments yourself – that people with diabetes “can’t eat candy”; that all you have to do is just take your medication and it all just works out; that type 1 only happens to kids (and they somehow magically will outgrow it); that type 2 diabetes is somehow “earned” due to obesity or laziness.

The truth is that type 2 diabetes exists on a large spectrum, and there is still much to learn about why and how it occurs, and in whom. Not every person diagnosed with type 2 diabetes fits the stereotypes, and we’d like to introduce you to a few: Phyllisa, Rachel, Joe, and Sue.

Video: Emily

Contributor: Emily; http://aimingforaverage-a1c.blogspot.com/

Connection: Adult with type 1 diabetes

Quote: “A lot of people sympathize with me when they hear that I have to inject myself with a huge needle every three days when I change my infusion site. I guess it’s easy for non-diabetics to sympathize with the physical pain, because that’s something they can understand or have experienced themselves, but what they can’t understand is the other kinds of pain that come with this disease: the loneliness of feeling like you’re the only one having to deal with it, the anger and self-pity that comes when you’re wondering, ‘Why me?’, and the frustration and disappointment when your A1C comes back too high.”

“We Can Do This”: Vol. 2

(For those who live with anxiety, even talking or reading about anxiety can be a trigger, so please proceed with caution before watching the video below.)

You may remember the “We Can Do This” video from this past April, in which five people who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as adults shared their diagnosis stories, lessons learned and advice for others who may be going through the same thing.

Keeping in line with that format, Vol. 2 gives a glimpse into the life of people who live with both anxiety and diabetes (or care for someone with diabetes). People already living with diabetes are about 20 percent more likely than those without diabetes to have an anxiety condition at some point in their lifetime, and it’s a topic that many are uncomfortable talking about.

And because the You Can Do This Project centers around the idea of opening up about the tough stuff – that’s exactly what Kate, Alexis, and Hallie did.

To connect with others with diabetes and anxiety, check out the new community “Anxious You Anxious Me” on Facebook and Twitter. You may also email Alexis directly at Anxietyyouanxietyme@gmail.com.

Video: Joe Solowiejczyk

Contributor: Joe; Children With Diabetes

Connection: Adult with type 1 diabetes

Quote: “For me, the most difficult thing to come to terms with has been dealing with feelings of anger, rage, and frustration. I used to think that if I had those feelings, I was doing something wrong. It took me a long time and a lot of work to come to the realization and understanding that feelings are just a guide, and not a sign of whether I’m doing well or not.”

Video: Josh Bliel

 

Contributor: Josh Bliel; community spokesperson for the Indianapolis Colts

Connection: No known personal connection to diabetes; Iraq war veteran with double leg amputation.

Quote: “It was a big realization for me that other people deal with things too, and it’s normal. It’s okay to feel angry.”

Video: Steve

 

Contributor: Steve Richert; livingvertical.org

Connection: Adult with type 1 diabetes

Quote: “My biggest challenge has always been staying positive and keeping my mind focused on what I want and what I want to do, as opposed to what I’m afraid of and what I’m worried about. If I can climb a mountain and live with diabetes, you can pursue your passion [too]. Don’t let diabetes stop you.”